Viennese Schrammelmusik and its origin

When did the Viennese Schrammelmusik come into being and after whom is it named? Where was it mainly performed? Which city in Austria is considered the "Schrammelstadt"?

When did the Viennese Schrammelmusik come into being and after whom is it named? Where was it mainly performed? Which city in Austria is considered the "Schrammelstadt"?

The Schrammelmusik is Viennese folk music, which dates back to the end of the 19th century. However, it can not be described as originally Viennese, as it was brought from the Waldviertel to Vienna.

However, the name comes from two Viennese musicians, namely the brothers Johann and Josef Schrammel, who were well-known violinists and composers. In 1878, they formed a trio with guitarist Anton Strohmayer and offered folk songs in wine taverns and inns.

Kaspar Schrammel, the father of the famous brothers, was born in Litschau in the Waldviertel. Therefore, this city is considered Schrammelstadt. To this day, the annual Schrammel Klang Festival takes place there.

In 1884, the clarinetist Georg Dänzer joined the trio and from now on they appeared as "Quartet Gebrüder Schrammel" in Palais and salons of the Viennese high society. Also at balls they were constant guests and of course at the wine taverns. Strauss and Johannes Brahms were considered Schrammel admirers, and later Arnold Schönberg.

The "Wienerlied" was known as "Schrammelmusik". It is all about the murmuring, almost weeping kind of music with the typical Schrammelharmonika and the double guitar (Kontragitarre) and the clarinet, also known as "picksüßes Hölzl".

In only seven years, the brothers Schrammel composed about 200 songs and died both completely exhausted at the age of just 43 years before their father.

Every Monday until today the "Schrammelmontag" takes place in the Liebhartstaler Bockkeller in Ottakring. The "Neue Wiener Concert Schrammeln" play original Schrammel music and bring the old time back to life. The Wienerlied is thus experiencing a renaissance, e.g. through the "wean hean", the Wienerlied Festival.

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